U. TEXAS-AUSTIN (US)—White women are becoming more optimistic about menopause, with many seeing it as an opportunity to rethink their lives and redefine themselves, a new study shows.

This is just one of the positive changes in the way women across different ethnic groups are experiencing the change of life, researchers at the University of Texas at Austin found.

The study also shows that women are getting support from their family and friends and some even mentioned relief and benefits when going through menopause.

Past studies have shown that white women, in particular, were concerned about menopause as a “harbinger of physical aging taking them away from society’s youthful ideal,” says Eun-Ok Im, a nursing professor.

“Most of the white participants in our study say they try to be humorous and laugh—to boost their inner strength and motivate themselves to go through the hardships during the menopausal transition.”

Im’s four-year study looked at ethnic differences in menopausal symptoms reported by Whites, Hispanics, African American, and Asian women. The study was done via an Internet survey among 512 women and included equal numbers of mid-age (40 to 60 years old) participants from each ethnic group. Study results are reported in the Western Journal of Nursing Research.

“A possible reason for the positive changes in the way white women look at menopause might be that the recent women’s health movement has educated women to accept menopause as a normal developmental process, allowing them to refocus on themselves,” Im says.

African American, Hispanic, and Asian women already reported being more optimistic and positive about their menopause and menopause symptoms than white women.

In Im’s study, black participants cited they were raised to be strong and accepting of a natural aging process. They perceived that — compared to other difficulties in their lives — menopause was just another part of life to endure.

Getting support from family and friends during the menopausal transition is especially new to the literature on the menopausal symptom experience of Hispanic women, Im said.

“An interesting new finding, however, is that minority women prefer support from those who are of the same ethnicity,” she said.

Minority participants also expressed their need for more information and educational programs, which Im sees as an additional encouraging sign. In the past, ethnic minority groups rarely talked about menopause with others and hardly ever said they wanted more information about the change of life, she said.

Im’s study supported research that found significant ethnic differences in the total number and severity of menopausal symptoms.

Im believes her findings will work to eliminate ethnic biases and inequity in menopausal symptom management and promote culturally competent care for menopausal women. Earlier research about menopause has mostly been with white women, she noted.

“The increasing ethnic diversity of our population requires health professionals to practice with greater cultural competence,” she said.

The work was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

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