View more articles about

According to the results of a small online survey of men and women, 37 percent of male respondents wanted to date only women shorter than they are, while 55 percent of female respondents wanted to date only men taller than they are. (Credit: Sheng Han/Flickr)

attraction

In matters of the heart, women say height matters

Though similarity often dominates our choice in mates, researchers say height differences may matter more to women than men.

The research was conducted in two parts. Part one, which used data from the Yahoo! personal dating advertisements of 455 males (average height of 5 feet 8 inches and average age of 36 years) and 470 females (average height of 5 feet 4 inches and average age of 35 years) from throughout the United States, found that 13.5 percent of the men wanted to date only women shorter than they are. In contrast, nearly half of the women—48.9 percent—wanted to date only men taller than they are.

[related]

“Evolutionary psychology theory argues that ‘similarity is overwhelmingly the rule in human mating,'” says Michael Emerson, professor of sociology at Rice University and the study’s co-author. “However, our study suggests that for physical features such as height, similarity is not the dominant rule, especially with females.”

The second part of the research included 54 male (average height of 5 feet 9 inches) and 131 female volunteers (average height of 5 feet 4 inches) recruited from a US university. The participants answered open-ended questions in an online survey. The findings were similar to the first part of the study: 37 percent of male respondents wanted to date only women shorter than they are, while 55 percent of female respondents wanted to date only men taller than they are.

According to the study, published in the Journal of Family Issues, the dominant reasons females cited for preferring a tall partner are matters of protection and femininity.

Men were much less likely to say that height mattered, and for those that did, they preferred shorter women, but not so short that it would cause problems with physical intimacy.

George Yancey, a professor of sociology at the University of North Texas and the study’s lead author, believes that the height preferences of men and women can be explained by traditional societal expectations and gender stereotypes.

He notes that it is a widespread perception that tall height is a personal asset for men and a personal liability for women. He says that the study’s finding that height matters more to women supports the social system of patriarchy, in which males are the primary authority figures.

“The masculine ability to offer physical protection is clearly connected to the gender stereotype of men as protectors,” he says. “And in a society that encourages men to be dominant and women to be submissive, having the image of tall men hovering over short women reinforces this value.”

Rice University funded the study.

Source: Rice University

Related Articles