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Feed kids veggies for starters

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When preschoolers were given carrots as a first course during lunch, average broccoli consumption later in the meal tripled. “The great thing about this study is the very clear and easy message for parents and caregivers that while you are preparing dinner, put some vegetables out for your children to snack on while they’re hungry,” say the researchers. (Credit: iStockphoto)

PENN STATE (US)—Serving children vegetables as a first course helps them eat healthier throughout the meal, new research shows.

“We have shown that you can use portion size strategically to encourage children and adults to eat more of the foods that are high in nutrients but low in calories,” says Barbara Rolls, Helen A. Guthrie Chair of Nutritional Sciences at Penn State.

Rolls and colleagues served lunch to 51 children at a daycare center on four occasions and measured their vegetable intake. Children were provided with no carrots or 30 grams (about 1 ounce), 60 grams (about 2 ounces), or 90 grams (about 3 ounces) of carrots as the first course of their lunch. The team’s findings appear in the current issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

The children had 10 minutes to eat the carrots, after which they were served pasta, broccoli, unsweetened applesauce, and low-fat milk. Preschool children who received no first course of carrots, consumed about 23 grams (nearly 1 ounce) of broccoli from the main course.

When the children received 30 grams (about 1 ounce) of carrots at the start of the meal, their broccoli intake rose by nearly 50 percent compared to having no carrots as a first course.

But when the first course was increased to 60 grams (about 2 ounces) of carrots, average broccoli consumption nearly tripled to about 63 grams—or a third of the recommended vegetable intake for preschool children. The extra carrots eaten at the start of lunch did not reduce the amount of broccoli eaten in the main course, but added to the total amount of vegetables consumed.

“We gave the children carrots first without other competing foods,” explains Rolls. “When they are hungry at the start of the meal, it presents us with an opportunity to get them to eat more vegetables.”

According to Maureen Spill, graduate student in nutrition and study coauthor, the findings challenge the conventional belief that children won’t eat vegetables. It also provides parents a simple strategy to get their children eating a more healthy and nutritious diet, she says.

“The great thing about this study is the very clear and easy message for parents and caregivers that while you are preparing dinner, put some vegetables out for your children to snack on while they’re hungry,” says Spill.

“Parents also need to set an example by eating vegetables while children are young and impressionable.”

The National Institutes of Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation supported this work.

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