Feathers have ‘custom’ shafts for flight

"In terms of engineering, we hope to apply our future findings in materials science to yacht masts and propeller blades, and to apply the aeronautical findings to build better micro-air vehicles in a collaboration [with] engineers at the university," says Christian Laurent. Above, a guinea hen feather. (Credit: Dan Gutwein/Flickr)

The shafts of feathers are made of a multi-layered fibrous composite material—a lot like carbon fiber—that lets the feather bend and twist in flight.

Since their appearance more than 150 million years ago, feather shafts (rachises) have evolved to be some of the lightest, strongest, and most fatigue-resistant natural structures.

However, relatively little work has been done on their morphology, especially from a mechanical perspective, and never at the nanoscale.

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The study, which appears in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, is the first to use nano-indentation, a materials-testing technique, on feathers. It reveals the number, proportion, and relative orientation of rachis layers is not fixed, as previously thought, and varies according to flight style.

“We started looking at the shape of the rachis and how it changes along the length of it to accommodate different stresses. Then we realized that we had no idea how elastic it was, so we indented some sample feathers,” says lead author Christian Laurent of Ocean and Earth Science at the University of Southampton.

“Previously, the only mechanical work on feathers was done in the 1970s but under the assumption that the material properties of feathers are the same when tested in different directions, known as isotropic—our work has now invalidated this.”

The researchers tested the material properties of feathers from three birds of different species with markedly different flight styles: the Mute Swan (Cygnus olor), the Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), and the partridge (Perdix perdix).

“Our results indicate that the number, and the relative thickness, of layers around the circumference of the rachis and along the feather’s length are not fixed, and may vary either in order to cope with the stresses of flight particular to the bird or to the lineage that the individual belongs to,” adds Laurent, who led the study as part of his research degree in vertebrate paleontology.

The researchers hope to fully model feather functions and link morphological aspects to particular flight styles and lineages. Those findings would have implications for paleontology and engineering.

“We hope to be able to scan fossil feathers and finally answer a number of questions—What flew first? Did flight start from the trees down, or from the ground up? Could Archaeopteryx fly? Was Archaeopteryx the first flying bird?” asks Laurent.

“In terms of engineering, we hope to apply our future findings in materials science to yacht masts and propeller blades, and to apply the aeronautical findings to build better micro-air vehicles in a collaboration [with] engineers at the university.”

Source: University of Southampton