dinosaurs

Dog-sized dino species discovered in Texas

texacephale_reconstruction_1

Texacephale langstoni had softball-sized lumps of bone on top of their skulls. Researchers found two of the fossilized domes (below) in Big Bend National Park in southwest Texas. Scientists speculate the dinosuars used the lumps of bone on top of their skulls to ram one another head-on. The discovery of the new species lends further weight to the idea that dinosaurs found in Canada and the northern United States were distinct from their southern neighbors. (Credit: Nicholas Longrich/Yale)

YALE (US)—Paleontologists have discovered a new species of dinosaur with a softball-sized lump of solid bone on top of its skull.

The species was a plant-eating dinosaur about as big as a medium-sized dog that lived 70 to 80 million years ago, says Nicholas Longrich of Yale University, lead author of the paper published in the journal Cretaceous Research.

dinosaur_dome_2

(Credit: Nicholas Longrich/Yale)

The team discovered two skull fragments in Big Bend National Park in southwest Texas in 2008. They compared them to dozens of fossils from related species found in Canada and Montana before confirming that the fossils represented a new genus of pachycephalosaur, a group of bipedal, thick-skulled dinosaurs.

The researchers named the new species Texacephale langstoni. (“Texacephale” means “Texas head” and “langstoni” is in honor of Wann Langston, a fellow paleontologist.)

The new species is one of about a dozen known to have solid lumps of bone on top of their skulls, which Longrich speculates was probably used to ram one another head-on in a manner similar to modern-day musk oxen and cape buffalo.

The discovery of the new species lends further weight to the idea, which has gained popularity in recent years, that dinosaurs found in Canada and the northern United States were distinct from their southern neighbors.

“Instead of roaming across the North American continent, we see pockets of different dinosaurs that are pretty isolated from one another,” Longrich says. “Every time we get good fossils from Texas, they end up looking very different from those to the north.”

Because fossils from the Big Bend region are rare and tend to be poorly preserved, scientists do not have a complete picture of the different species that once inhabited the area, Longrich says.

But the team may have uncovered an important piece of the puzzle with their discovery. They found that this particular group of dinosaurs, which was previously thought to have originated in Asia, likely evolved in North America.

Longrich expects more related species to be discovered in the future as fossils from the Texas site and elsewhere continue to be examined.

“I think we underestimate how many different species there were,” he says.

Yale University news: www.opa.yale.edu/

Related Articles