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Why married men behave better

MICHIGAN STATE (US) — It’s a chicken-or-egg question: Does marriage curb antisocial behavior in men, or are less antisocial men more likely to get married? New research suggests the answer is both.

Less antisocial men were more likely to get married, according to a study with twins. But, once they were wed, the marriage itself appeared to further inhibit antisocial behavior. Details are reported in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

The study is the first to investigate the effects of marriage on antisocial behavior using a genetically informative twin sample to rule out the effects of genes on these associations. The researchers examined the data of 289 pairs of male twins. The twins were assessed four times, at ages 17, 20, 24, and 29.

The study found that men with lower levels of antisocial behavior at ages 17 and 20 were more likely to have married by age 29 (researchers refer to the act of entering into marriage as a selection process). This is noteworthy since previous studies found little support that selection process influenced reduced rates of antisocial behavior among married men.

“Our results indicate that the reduced rate of antisocial behavior in married men is more complicated than we previously thought,” says Alexandra Burt, associate professor of psychology at Michigan State University. “Marriage is generally good for men, at least in terms of reducing antisocial behavior, but the data also indicate that it’s not random who enters into the state of marriage.”

Burt says her finding may differ from past studies because marital rates have declined significantly in recent years, whereas marriage was more of the norm in the 1950s, meaning selection likely wasn’t much of a factor.

Once the men were married, rates of antisocial behavior declined even more. When comparing identical twins in which one twin had married while the other had not, Burt says, the married twin generally engaged in lower levels of antisocial behavior than did the unmarried twin.

Burt adds that it’s unlikely that marriage inhibits men’s antisocial behavior directly, but rather that marriage is a marker for other factors such as social bonding or less time spent with delinquent peers. Another factor that seems to be important is marriage quality; the effect of marriage on antisocial behavior tends to be stronger in better marriages.

Researchers from the University of Minnesota collaborated on the study.

More news from Michigan State: http://news.msu.edu/

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3 Comments

  1. Dr. O'

    One question. Has there been any evaluation concerning the rate of domestic violence in and out of marriage?

  2. Awil Mohamud

    that is why one of the Islamic principles courages the youth to get marry……and its said that when you marry you really attained your full faith. so this research findings is not new to Muslims……..

  3. Byong

    That happens because after you get married, your focus is not just you, but your family as well.

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