"Marine mammals rely primarily on sound to navigate, to find food, and to find mates. Sound is their modality," says  Kate Staffords. "If we increase the ambient sound level, it has the potential to reduce the communication range of cetaceans and all marine mammals." (Credit: Gillfoto via Wikimedia Commons)

Whales and ships fight for space in noisy Arctic

The Arctic is home to a growing number of whales and ships, and to populations of sub-Arctic whales that are expanding their territory into newly ice-free Arctic waters.

Three years of underwater recordings that track the whales by their sounds reveal more detections of both Arctic and sub-Arctic whales traveling through the Bering Strait’s narrow choke point.

The recordings show Arctic beluga and bowhead whales migrating seasonally through the region from the Arctic south to spend winter in the Bering Sea. They also detect large numbers of sub-Arctic humpback, fin, and killer whales traveling north through the Bering Strait to feed in the biologically rich Chukchi Sea.

The Bering Strait is a shallow, 58-mile-wide channel between Russia and Alaska that connects the Pacific and Arctic oceans. The Chukchi Sea is to the north, and the Bering Sea is to the south. (Credit: NASA)
The Bering Strait is a shallow, 58-mile-wide channel between Russia and Alaska that connects the Pacific and Arctic oceans. The Chukchi Sea is to the north, and the Bering Sea is to the south. (Credit: NASA)

“It’s not particularly surprising to those of us who work up in the Arctic,” says Kate Stafford, affiliate associate professor of oceanography at the University of Washington. “The Arctic seas are changing. We are seeing and hearing more species, farther north, more often. And that’s a trend that is going to continue.”

For a study published in Oceanography and presented this week at the Ocean Sciences meeting in Honolulu, Stafford placed microphones below the water’s surface and recorded in summer and early winter from 2009 to 2012 as part of a US-Russian scientific collaboration.

Melodious humpback whale songs showed up regularly on recordings into late fall. Fin and killer whales, which are southern species that seldom travel into Arctic waters, were heard into early November.

“These animals are expanding their range,” Stafford says. “They’re taking advantage of regions in seasons that they may not have previously.”

Risk of collision

The recordings also picked up ships using the ice-free summers to travel through two international shipping lanes. This poses an increased risk of collisions between whales and ships, and of noise pollution.

“Marine mammals rely primarily on sound to navigate, to find food, and to find mates. Sound is their modality,” Stafford says. “If we increase the ambient sound level, it has the potential to reduce the communication range of cetaceans and all marine mammals.”

The Bering Strait is famous as a land bridge that prehistoric humans used to travel from Russia to North America. Today, the waterway is 58 miles wide and maximum 160 feet deep, with about one-third of its span in US waters and the rest in Russia.

The two coasts are quite different, Stafford says, which makes the international collaboration essential to understanding the full environment.

The paper includes visual sightings of killer whales, a quieter southern-dwelling whale, just north of the strait in the southern Chukchi Sea. Killer whales are now seen fairly regularly in this area, which is being considered for oil and gas exploration.

Changing seas

“The Arctic areas are changing,” Stafford says. “They are becoming more friendly to sub-Arctic species, and we don’t know how that will impact Arctic whales. Will they be competitors for food? Will they be competitors for habitat? Will they be competitors for acoustic space, for instance these humpbacks yapping all the time in the same frequency band that bowheads use to communicate? We just don’t know.”

Stafford supports the idea of slowing ship speeds in the Bering Strait, reducing motor noise and the chance of ship strikes.

Another suggestion to protect whales builds on tagging work showing that bowhead whales tend to travel up the US side on the way north in the spring and on the Russian side on their way back in the fall. The proposal suggests that ships follow the American coast in the fall and the Russian coast in the spring to reduce interactions between ships and whales.

Still to be explored is whether the increased whale travel through the region is due to rising whale populations, expanded ranges, or both. Logbooks from Soviet whaling ships in the mid-to-late 20th century report sub-Arctic whales in the region, but none were seen from about 1980 to 2010.

“The question is, are these whale populations recovering and so they’re reoccupying former habitat, or are they actually invading the Arctic because they can, because there is less seasonal sea ice?” Stafford says.

Researchers from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration contributed to the study, which was funded by the US National Science Foundation, NOAA, and the Interior Department’s Bureau of Ocean and Energy Management.

Source: University of Washington

 

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