Soybean aphids: 2 steps forward, 1 step back

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Above, a soybean plant with heavy colonization of soybean aphids. Below, a soybean aphid resistant plant (left) and susceptible plant (right). “We don’t know how widespread those aphids are or whether or not this is actually going to occur in fields, but certainly it’s something to be concerned about because we know that resistance isn’t going to be perfect,” says Brian Diers. (Courtesy: Illinois)

U. ILLINOIS (US)—Researchers have developed a soybean that is resistant to aphids but at the same time, discovered a new aphid resistant to the resistance.

aphid_2Glen Hartman, soybean plant pathologist at the University of Illinois, says he and colleagues have screened “a small set of 4,000 to 5,000 different soybean accessions and from those, the first two resistant varieties, Dowling and Jackson, were identified.

“We knew they were resistant, but we had to do the crossings and look at the inheritance patterns to figure out whether the resistance was because of a single gene or multiple genes.”

With additional screening, a third soybean resistant to aphids was found—a Japanese variety known as PI 200538.

“After we mapped the genes from these sources, we discovered that Jackson and Dowling had genes mapping to the same place on a chromosome and the PI had a gene mapping to a different place. This means that Jackson and Dowling likely have the same resistance gene and PI 200538 has a different gene we can use in breeding, Hartman explains.”

“Because the aphid resistance is conferred by a single gene in the resistance sources, we were able to breed these genes into Midwest-adapted varieties quickly and easily,” Hartman’s colleague Brian Diers explains.

“We can complete three crossing generations a year by using both greenhouses and fields. This year is a milestone because we now have a variety that’s being commercially produced that carries the resistance gene from Dowling. This is its first commercial production of an aphid-resistant variety in the Midwest.”

Unfortunately, the celebration didn’t last long. While studying soybean plants, they discovered a new type of aphid.

“We were excited about finding the resistance. We discovered this gene from Dowling and Jackson, bred it into varieties and we ‘hoped that we could solve the aphid problem,’ but of course things are never that simple,” Diers explains.

“We found that there are different biotypes of soybean aphids, including a biotype that can overcome the resistance gene for Dowling.”

In tests, this new aphid was able to infest Dowling as well as it could any susceptible genotype of soybean.

“We don’t know how widespread those aphids are or whether or not this is actually going to occur in fields, but certainly it’s something to be concerned about because we know that resistance isn’t going to be perfect,” Diers says.

The good news is that the PI 200538 gene for resistance is different than the one in Dowling and Jackson. “We found that this second resistance gene in the PI protects the plants against this new biotype of aphid. We are currently breeding the PI 200538 gene into varieties, but it will be at least a few years before any varieties with this gene will be released.”

Even after the appearance of this new aphid, Diers is still optimistic. “We have one variety with the Dowling resistance gene that’s being commercialized this year, he says. “A company is increasing seed of a second variety with the Dowling gene that should be commercialized next year. So we’ll have two varieties available to growers.”

Diers says resistant varieties can save farmers money and help the environment. “Farmers have been controlling soybean aphids by spraying insecticides. If we can deploy resistance, this could reduce the use of these insecticides, which will have many environmental benefits.”

The message to farmers is that there are going to be varieties with soybean aphid resistance available. “The tests we’ve done have shown that we have less aphid reproduction on these resistant lines than on susceptible lines,” Diers says.

“But so far the resistance isn’t a magic bullet. You can’t grow these aphid-resistant varieties and not scout for aphids because there may be aphids in your fields that can defeat the resistance.”

The other unknown is how adaptable aphids will be to these new varieties. “Our hope is that we can combine these two genes and get more durable resistance,” Diers says.

“We hope that we can develop a plant with a number of resistance genes so that if any one of them breaks down, the plant would still be resistant.”

The work appeared in the following journals: a 2007 issue of Molecular Breeding, the May-June 2008 issue of Crop Science, the July-August 2009 issue of Crop Science.

Funding was provided by the United Soybean Board and the Illinois Soybean Association.

University of Illinois news: http://www.aces.uiuc.edu/news

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