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Some kids with autism more tempted by suicide

PENN STATE (US) — Children with an autism spectrum disorder may be at greater risk for contemplating or attempting suicide than children without autism, according to a new report.

“We were looking at suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among children with autism versus those that didn’t have autism,” says Angela Gorman, assistant professor of child psychiatry at Penn State College of Medicine. “What we found is that there were some risk factors that were much more greatly associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts than others.”

The research is the first large-scale, broad age and IQ range study that uses data provided by parents to analyze the rates of suicide contemplation and attempts in children with autism.

For the study, researchers analyzed data provided by parents of 791 children with autism, 186 typical children, and 35 non-autistic depressed children between one and 16 years of age.

They looked at achievement and cognitive ability, as well as various demographic variables. The four most significant demographic variables were Black or Hispanic, 10 years old or older, socioeconomic status, and male.

The percentage of children with autism rated by their parents as sometimes to very often contemplating or attempting suicide was 28 times greater than that of typical children, though three times less than that of depressed non-autistic children. The four demographic variables were significant risk factors, as well.

“That was probably the most important piece of the study,” Gorman says. “If you fell into any of those categories and were rated to be autistic by a parent, the more categories you were a part of increased your chances for experiencing suicidal ideation or attempts.”

The frequency of suicidal contemplation in children with autism was twice as common in males, although gender differences were insignificant for suicide attempts. Autistic children with a parent in a professional or managerial position demonstrated a 10 percent rate of suicidal contemplation or attempts versus 16 percent for children whose parents worked in other occupations.

Black and Hispanic children had a 33 percent and 24 percent rate of suicide contemplation and attempts respectively versus whites at 13 percent and Asians at zero percent. Also, suicide contemplation and attempts were three times greater in children 10 years of age or older versus younger children.

According to the study, published in the journal Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, the majority of children, 71 percent, who had all four demographic factors had contemplated or attempted suicide. However, suicide contemplation and attempts were absent in 94 percent of children with autism without any of the four significant demographic risk factors.

Bullying adds to risk

Researchers also looked at the psychological and behavioral problems that were the most predictive of children who contemplated or attempted suicide and found that depression and behavior problems were highly associated with suicide contemplation and attempts, as were children who were teased or bullied.

“Out of those kids, almost half of them had suicidal ideation of attempts,” Gorman says. “That was pretty significant.”

Depression was the strongest single predictor of suicide contemplation or attempts in children with autism. Seventy-seven percent of children with autism who were considered by their parents to be depressed had suicide contemplation or attempts. Contemplation and attempts were absent in all autistic children who were not impulsive, 97 percent of those who did not have mood dysregulation, 95 percent of those who were not depressed and 93 percent of those who did not have behavior problems.

Therefore, children with autism who do not have mood or behavioral problems and do not fall into certain demographic categories are very unlikely to have suicide contemplation or attempts, according to the study.

The researchers were surprised to find that cognitive ability or IQ did not have much effect on whether or not children with autism experienced suicide contemplation or attempts, so both low functioning autistic children and higher functioning autistic children had similar results.

The researchers would now like to replicate the study with the addition of developing a “screening tool that can help us better rule out some of these issues and partition out some of these factors.”

This may include other predictors such as previous attempts, negative life events, family history of suicide, and biological and neurochemical variables. They may also replicate the study with a larger and more diverse minority representation and a broader socioeconomic status range.

Parents of autistic children should pay close attention to what is normal for their child in terms of behavior and emotions versus what is abnormal, develop early communication and social skills and, depending on cognitive ability, seek early intervention programs, therapists, and psychologists that can help build upon the protective factors that the patient has, such as supportive family and community and potentially high IQ.

Autism Speaks and the Children’s Miracle Network funded this study.

Source: Penn State

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2 Comments

  1. Kate hall

    Our 20 year old ASD son has been plagued with suicidal ideation
    Since 15 years old.
    He was bullied in school to the point of physical
    Abuse; been to the urgent care from injuries caused
    By others; had his school support the teacher and
    Child bullying;

    We finally left the school and brought him to
    A private school for ASD kids.
    He was seen by a neutologist/psychiatrist and
    Put on new anti depressants and monitored.
    Although he improved, he still fights with bouts
    Of depression , and has recently last year,
    Been 5150’ed for suicidal ideation.

    Within the last few months he has become fast
    Friends with some people his age also with depression
    Issues.
    Just having this connection has perked him up
    And helped him become more stable.
    He also sees a psychologist weekly, and psychiatrist
    Monthly.
    He is attempting to complete a semester of
    College with help from a tutor.
    Self sabotage is his constant companion

  2. LLLanham

    It is even harder for young adults with Autism/Asoerger’s to work through high school and tolerate the abuse and bullying only to be accepted at major colleges who really do not want them they realize they have special needs.

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