Bumble bee on butterfly flower

NY Farmers ask: Bumble bee or honey bee?

CORNELL (US) — As honey bee populations decline, New York farmers can count on the native eastern bumble bee to pollinate pumpkin crops—and boost yields.

“I was intrigued by honey bee colony collapse disorder and interested in the potential contribution of native bees for picking up the slack in vegetable crops like pumpkin that require pollinators,” says Brian Nault, associate professor of entomology at Cornell University.

“We found that the common eastern bumble bee (Bombus impatiens) was not only the most effective native pollinator for pumpkins, but that supplementing small pumpkin fields with bumble bee colonies significantly increased the number of pumpkins produced per plant.”

Pumpkins are big business in New York state: The 2010 crop was valued at $35 million, the highest in the nation. Nearly half of all vegetable farms in New York, which occupy 6,650 acres, grow pumpkins.

“For many growers, pumpkins are the last crop to be harvested and can make the difference between profit and loss,” says Steve Reiners, professor of horticulture and project collaborator. “Only the largest growers are currently supplementing their pumpkin fields with honey bee hives brought in to pollinate other crops, but I think the results of this study will generate interest in bumble bee supplementation among smaller producers as well.”

According to Nault, the bumble bee advantage is due to several factors. Compared with squash bees, eastern bumblebees searching for nectar make more visits to fruit—producing female flowers, where they deposit a greater number of pollen grains. They spend more time in the female flowers, and their larger size causes their pollen-laden hairs to graze the crucial spot for pollination: the stigmas.

Bumble bees also pollinate in cool and rainy weather that keeps honey bees hive-bound. However, like honey bees, they live in social colonies, making them amenable to commercialization in “quads,” boxes that provide shelter for four colonies and their broods.

Nault is expanding the project with a grant from the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. This experiment will put bumble bees in a head-to-head challenge with honey bees for the designation of best pumpkin pollinator.

“We hope to learn whether or not pumpkin producers in the Finger Lakes need to invest money and resources into renting, purchasing or maintaining bees to maximize yield,” says Jessica Petersen, the postdoctoral associate coordinating the study.

Based on the results, the team will develop a decision-making guide vegetable growers can use to determine if their fields should be supplemented with commercial bees or if native populations are sufficient to pollinate the crop.

They will also examine how landscape features, such as woods that can provide nesting sites, affect the abundance of the eastern common bumble bee. Molecular genetics will allow them to estimate the number of nests close to fields based on DNA fingerprinting.

“Pumpkins are a model crop for the cucurbit family, which includes cucumbers as well as summer and winter squashes,” says Nault. “We are interested in eventually extending the findings to these other crops, as well as learning more about native bees, their ecology and how they interact with vegetable crops in New York.”

More news from Cornell University: www.news.cornell.edu/

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  1. michele

    bumblebee do not produce honey as a byproduct of impollination as common bees do and honey is a good income for farmers in this hard times!

  2. Liza

    I really feel strongly about giving our native pollinators a chance to do their jobs. It is not natural for a honeybee hive to be moved from place to place unless the bee’s choose to swarm. I think transferring hives from place to place puts stresses on the hive and reduces their immune system. I feel very sorry for honeybee’s and what they are being asked to do.
    Working with native bees, including organic farming, allocating a portion of your property to have some forests area. Planting a host of nectar bearing flowers that attract bees will definitely take care of pollination of crops as well. There is an abundance of many varieties of pollinators, including some of the smaller bees who often are over looked because of their size. Bumblebees, sweat bees, carpenter bees, leaf-cutter bees and many more are waiting for an opportunity to rise in numbers. I witnessed this myself here with my own garden! I say give the locals (bees) a chance. Set them up to succeed, don’t use pesticides, go organic and they certainly will amaze you! It will not happen over night, but it will happen.

    Liza

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