Gene helps worm regrow missing head

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Planarian worms have an amazing ability to regenerate body parts following amputation. These remarkable creatures contain adult stem cells that are constantly dividing and can become all of the missing cell types. They also have the right set of genes working to make this happen exactly as it should so that when they re-grow body parts they end up in the right place and have the correct size, shape, and orientation. (Credit: Daniel Felix/U. Nottingham)

U. NOTTINGHAM (UK)—Scientists have discovered the gene that enables an extraordinary worm to regrow its whole head and brain—and other body parts—after amputation.

The finding is another step forward in efforts to explore how humans might one day regenerate damaged organs and tissue.

The research led by biologist Aziz Aboobaker at the University of Nottingham in the U.K. shows for the first time that a gene called ‘Smed-prep’ is essential for correctly regenerating a head and brain in planarian worms. The study is published in the open access journal PLoS Genetics.

Planarian worms have an amazing ability to regenerate body parts following amputation. These remarkable creatures contain adult stem cells that are constantly dividing and can become all of the missing cell types.

They also have the right set of genes working to make this happen exactly as it should so that when they re-grow body parts they end up in the right place and have the correct size, shape, and orientation.

“These amazing worms offer us the opportunity to observe tissue regeneration in a very simple animal that can regenerate itself to a remarkable extent and does so as a matter of course,” Aboobaker says.

“We want to be able to understand how adult stem cells can work collectively in any animal to form and replace damaged or missing organs and tissues. Any fundamental advances in understanding from other animals can become relevant to humans surprisingly quickly.

“If we know what is happening when tissues are regenerated under normal circumstances, we can begin to formulate how to replace damaged and diseased organs, tissues and cells in an organized and safe way following an injury caused by trauma or disease.”

Aboobaker says this would be desirable for treating conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. “With this knowledge we can also assess the consequences of what happens when stem cells go wrong during the normal processes of renewal—for example in the blood cell system where rogue stem cells can result in Leukemia.”

Smed-prep is necessary for the correct differentiation and location of the cells that make up a planarian worm’s head. It is also sufficient for defining where the head should be located on the worm.

The team have found that although the presence of Smed-prep is vital so that the head and brain are in the right place, the worm stem cells can still be persuaded to form brain cells as a result of the action of other unrelated genes. But even so, without Smed-prep these cells do not organize themselves to form a normal brain.

“The understanding of the molecular basis for tissue remodeling and regeneration is of vital importance for regenerative medicine,” says Daniel Felix, a graduate student who carried out the experimental work. “Planarians are famous for their immense power of regeneration, being able to regenerate a new head after decapitation. With the homeobox gene Smed-prep, we have characterized the first gene necessary for correct anterior fate and patterning during regeneration.”

More news from the University of Nottingham: http://communications.nottingham.ac.uk/News.html

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3 Comments

  1. Johnny

    This is truly amazing but i would like to see what this gene could do in an animal or human. Would it effect the aging proccess and would it heal a bullet hole

  2. kyon

    Even if this study has potential, wouldn’t it feel like this could be wrong? I mean, as we have all learned, other countries of opposing sides in war have imitated each other’s technology. This may become disastrous. Though the idea of regenerative soldiers is a good sword for warfare, what of surgery and other medicine practices that require operating on the body? Indeed it is true that it will have lasting effects on the human race, some which are beneficial, it is probably not a good idea to apply regenerative abilities to humans or other animals for that matter. If something like this gets out of hand, we would be ushering forth the immortal apocalypse of which life would never be gone to waste away as we humans were intended to. Think about it. The lasting effects on humans, if the research were to be done, would be lasting longer than expected. In fact, if nobody could die, what would happen to our resources? I know by now I sound like an environmentalist, but I am actually a high school student who does not really care much for the human existence because I really do care about the human existence. I could go on, but I think this is enough to cover my thoughts.

  3. patathomas

    Does the severed planarian worm’s head grow another body?

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