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Anxiety can ‘burn out’ women’s brains

MICHIGAN STATE (US) — The brains of anxious women work much harder than those of men, new research shows.

The finding stems from an experiment in which college students performed a relatively simple task while their brain activity was measured by an electrode cap. Only women who identified themselves as particularly anxious or big worriers recorded high brain activity when they made mistakes during the task.

Jason Moser, lead investigator on the project, says the findings may ultimately help mental health professionals determine when females at a younger age are prone to anxiety problems such as obsessive compulsive disorder or generalized anxiety disorder.

“This may help predict the development of anxiety issues later in life for girls,” says Moser, assistant professor of psychology at Michigan State University. “It’s one more piece of the puzzle for us to figure out why women in general have more anxiety disorders.”

The study, reported in the International Journal of Psychophysiology, is the first to measure the correlation between worrying and error-related brain responses in the sexes using a scientifically viable sample (79 female students, 70 males).

Participants were asked to identify the middle letter in a series of five-letter groups on a computer screen. Sometimes the middle letter was the same as the other four (“FFFFF”) while sometimes it was different (“EEFEE”). Afterward they filled out questionnaires about how much they worry.

Although the worrisome female subjects performed about the same as the males on simple portions of the task, their brains had to work harder at it. Then, as the test became more difficult, the anxious females performed worse, suggesting worrying got in the way of completing the task, Moser says.

“Anxious girls’ brains have to work harder to perform tasks because they have distracting thoughts and worries,” Moser explains. “As a result their brains are being kind of burned out by thinking so much, which might set them up for difficulties in school. We already know that anxious kids—and especially anxious girls—have a harder time in some academic subjects such as math.”

Currently Moser and colleagues are investigating whether estrogen, a hormone more common in women, may be responsible for the increased brain response. Estrogen is known to affect the release of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that plays a key role in learning and processing mistakes in the front part of the brain.

“This may end up reflecting hormone differences between men and women,” Moser says.

In addition to traditional therapies for anxiety, Moser says other ways to potentially reduce worry and improve focus include journaling—or “writing your worries down in a journal rather than letting them stick in your head”—and doing “brain games” designed to improve memory and concentration.

More news from Michigan State University: news.msu.edu

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3 Comments

  1. cindy

    I am concerned about a researcher (Jason Moser) who after his study reports results described as “kinda burned out by thinking so much.” His solution is “journaling.” I am hoping that my tax dollars are not going to this.

    Also, Michigan State is under severe scrutiny right now for its frivolous and meaningless use of animals (mammals including kittens) in training and research.

    Discerning readers should vet this study and its source before making any clinical decisions reference patient care.

  2. Lilly

    Yes, makes you anxious, doesn’t it?

  3. Kimberley

    @Cindy

    I really do hope that there isn’t anyone out there who would make a clinical decision based in something that they read in a blog.

    Also, Moser’s comment may seem a little fillipant but I doubt that it is a direct quote from published work/work to be published. A lot of research sounds unnecessary without the full picture. However, any findings from this research would certainly give an indication of how education could be improved by helping us to better understand how children learn. A worthy cause.

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